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SWAT Cop Gets Shot in Chest, Face During Police Shootout With Suspect in Los Angeles, California


FrommerStop

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While not shield specific, individual armor has come a long way as well. In the pic below, the thinner plate on the left comes with our standard soft armor vests issued to patrol. When used in-conjunction with, it provides IIIA protection. At just 1/2 thick and just under 1.5 pounds, you really don't know you're wearing it.

The plate on the right is 1" thick, 2.4 pounds, and offers level III and some level IV stand alone protection.

I keep both handy in my front seat and can slip either one of them down my shirt and into my vest in seconds.

There is this special polymer armor, I forget the specific name of the material, that is light and can be made in a rating between level III and IV, meaning it will stop a hot loaded M193 round from a 20 inch barrel. Which is normally the worst threat. When they first came out those plates were cheap, but the price want up fast last time I looked a couple of years ago.
Most armor leaves many parts of the body exposed. A hit at under a 100 yards from a 308 hunting rifle with lighter highspeed frangible bullets would destroy a lot of tissue for a hit under the vest. Maybe one might survive it with immediate advanced care. One hit over the vest could certainly result in death due to destruction of major blood vessels or neural CNS anatomy even with quick access to an ER.
 

Raven

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You could not pay me enough to advance on an armed man under those conditions.

The officer that got shot in the face was not properly trained in use of his firearm. You can not safely have a dominant side for shooting if you have to go around a corner. If the corner is to the left, then the gun is fired from left. You want to present the smallest target possible. It will not absolutely save you, but you get better odds of not getting shot. I am not sure if the corner was cover or concealment. There were projectile strikes on and the weapon used appears to be shotgun. So that corner probably offered cover if the shotgun was loaded with buckshot.



View attachment 114575
In MOUT training they taught us to expect at least 40% casualties. I bet the odds for casualties are higher for law enforcement. They had this guy outnumbered, surrounded, gassed, etc etc etc, and still this guy got stupid and thought he could take them. Mental illness is the only explanation.
 

FrommerStop

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In MOUT training they taught us to expect at least 40% casualties. I bet the odds for casualties are higher for law enforcement. They had this guy outnumbered, surrounded, gassed, etc etc etc, and still this guy got stupid and thought he could take them. Mental illness is the only explanation.
Even if he was were sane to begin with, meth along with other drugs will make you crazy is my understanding of it.
 

Raven

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We train with and use shields A LOT... we would have advanced to a position of containment (which is what it looks like they did) with a least one shield (we often use two)… once they occupied that corner, they could have brought a shield up.

LA ain't no rookies when it comes to SWAT business so I wonder why they didn't have a shield.
The cop that got hit was a rookie, unfortunately
 

Raven

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The threat level anticipated/expected can play a role in shield selection. Some folks deploy with what they have knowing the threat level potential exceeds the protection level. Something is better than nothing. Acquire what you can afford.

As far as the rating system goes... I've shot a lot of "expired" rifle plates (ceramic) and they ALL performed better than the advertised rating and sustained multiple hits within inches before a pass-through. I've even physically abused them, batting them across the range with a hammer and slamming them on the pavement as hard as I could... they performed as designed and the abuse did not compromised their ability to stop rounds. I have those plates displayed in my classroom.

All of our supervisors carry shields in their vehicles, this is the one I carry, it's a IIIA, which is good for most handguns and shotguns, which is what I considered universal threats... meaning just assume a pistol or shotgun is in play. It weighs under 20 pounds if I had to guess.



It has a support/carry handle and strap, so carrying it for extended periods is not difficult. Sometimes you can hook it on your gear and let it free float.



We also have some level III shields, but as you know, they are heavier. This shield will stop some ball ammo. Again, I've shot IIIA plates with stuff level IV is designed to stop with success... not saying that's a given fact across the board. It also has a support system for carry.



In the video, the BG had a SG... the IIIA shield I carry would have been fine. Of course the ultra fast cartridges out there will defeat these shields. Sorry for the long reply...
Shields are bad ass and have worked for thousands of years. The people who think a half inch piece of lead is dangerous should watch a few videos about the four foot long projectiles getting launched from English longbows, and accurately piercing plate armor helmets at 100 yards. Shields have been the thing to have for a long long time.
 

Bowhntr6pt

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Sounds like they have already identified and addressed the shortcomings of the op.

As the team commander of a 22-man team, I've empowered every team member to be assertive in their tactical assessments during operations... assessment never ends... it starts when you get the alerts and doesn't stop until you're in the debrief room.

Someone should have mentioned shields... hate to Monday QB this... perhaps there was a reason.
 

Duckyou

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There is this special polymer armor, I forget the specific name of the material, that is light and can be made in a rating between level III and IV, meaning it will stop a hot loaded M193 round from a 20 inch barrel. Which is normally the worst threat. When they first came out those plates were cheap, but the price want up fast last time I looked a couple of years ago.
Most armor leaves many parts of the body exposed. A hit at under a 100 yards from a 308 hunting rifle with lighter highspeed frangible bullets would destroy a lot of tissue for a hit under the vest. Maybe one might survive it with immediate advanced care. One hit over the vest could certainly result in death due to destruction of major blood vessels or neural CNS anatomy even with quick access to an ER.

Keep a look out at graphene. The production costs are coming down and it is extremely thin. This shows potential for being great for body armor. Batteries are bringing down the cost - and I hear they can now make a sheet for $10,000 and it used to cost $250,000.
 

Jdcujo

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What level of protection for a ballistic shield would you recommend? In the posted video scenario the methhead had a long arm and was shooting at any target presented.
Apparently shields go up to level IV, but can get heavy. Some do come with wheels apparently.
Even the 3a threat level expired riot shields will take shot and slug . Good lord you will have a broken forearm if your arms through the handle though.
 
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