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Benjamin SAMROD scope question

Pilvr1983

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I am new to the airgun/shooting in general. I went all out (for me) and purchased a Benjamin Marauder Semi-auto for pest control. Disclosure: I don't have a range finder; i measured with a tape measure to about 15 yards and zeroed my scope (you-tube).

I can hit bullseye's all day. I tried to up my game increasing to 30 yards. Now my shooting is about 5 inches off. If I again zero scope to this yardage It is no longer good for the 15 yards.

What is the fix for this? Do I write down the first numbers then have to change the dials to the new range?

My target is mainly squirrels so 5" difference would be a sure miss.

Clueless
 

Snake-Eyes

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One very involved but doable fix that you can do without any ballistic computers or a rangefinder or a chronograph, with just the tools you have now:

Draw an overhead diagram of your shooting area, yard, whatever, and measure the distances from known shooting spots to possible target/squirrel locations. Make a list of all of those distances.

Setup for the distance you have already zeroed the scope, and max-recommended fill the Benjamin tank. As for the Benjamin SAM and fill pressure, I'm not sure what pressure delivers a string of shots with consistent FPS before dropping off. If you don't already know it, max fill the tank, then shoot a zero'd setup, noting the indicated pressure after each shot, while noting where each hit lands and which shot/pressure starts a chain of a "tighter group", that should give you a rough idea of what fill pressure starts the string without using a chronograph. Keep shooting until that tighter group starts falling off and that should tell you about how many shots you'll get in the string before needing a topoff.

If your current ammo selection "agrees" with your airgun and groups acceptibly for a humane kill at 15-yards, then use your tape measure and "zero" the scope/rifle setup for the different yardages (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, etc, PLUS the distances you measured on your diagram), and Yes, write down exactly how many clicks and what settings your scope ends up at, for each yardage. Shoot a group at each distance after your zero is good. Plan ahead for topping off your Benjamin to the appropriate pressure fill. You want your shots to be consistently powered.

Whatever distance the groups open up too large for consistent humane shot placement (0.5"?), that becomes your extreme limit for squirrels. {But having scope settings for the other further distances will still be helpful for other uses like target shooting, working on fundamentals, reading the wind, etc., so it wasn't a waste of time.}

Back off your hunting limit by 5 yards, setup the target for the appropriate distance, and zero the scope with your recorded settings. Take a single shot. Should be right on. If not, you mis-measured the distance or mis-recorded the scope settings. If it IS right on, shoot a group. Great, now dial the zero setting for 5-yards closer, but don't change the distance to the target. Shoot another group. Make a note of where that new group compares, high/low/left/right. Clock position and distance. Set your scope zero to 5-yards farther than you actually are, shoot a group, and compare that one, too.

It will give you a good idea of drop-vs-distance, and how important a range-to-target is before taking the shot on an actual squirrel.

This will let you make a card for that scope/rifle/ammo combo. For the distances you will see.

It all can change if you tweak the power settings on the Benjamin, or remove or change the scope, or swap ammo.

After all that, you've got a personalized fill pressure, expected consistent shot string number, and scope dope card with ranges/zeroes/drop. Since the Benjamin SAM advertises an FPE of about 22, as long as you don't stretch the hunting shot too far, that .22 pellet should have enough energy to humanely do its job.
 

Pilvr1983

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One very involved but doable fix that you can do without any ballistic computers or a rangefinder or a chronograph, with just the tools you have now:

Draw an overhead diagram of your shooting area, yard, whatever, and measure the distances from known shooting spots to possible target/squirrel locations. Make a list of all of those distances.

Setup for the distance you have already zeroed the scope, and max-recommended fill the Benjamin tank. As for the Benjamin SAM and fill pressure, I'm not sure what pressure delivers a string of shots with consistent FPS before dropping off. If you don't already know it, max fill the tank, then shoot a zero'd setup, noting the indicated pressure after each shot, while noting where each hit lands and which shot/pressure starts a chain of a "tighter group", that should give you a rough idea of what fill pressure starts the string without using a chronograph. Keep shooting until that tighter group starts falling off and that should tell you about how many shots you'll get in the string before needing a topoff.

If your current ammo selection "agrees" with your airgun and groups acceptibly for a humane kill at 15-yards, then use your tape measure and "zero" the scope/rifle setup for the different yardages (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, etc, PLUS the distances you measured on your diagram), and Yes, write down exactly how many clicks and what settings your scope ends up at, for each yardage. Shoot a group at each distance after your zero is good. Plan ahead for topping off your Benjamin to the appropriate pressure fill. You want your shots to be consistently powered.

Whatever distance the groups open up too large for consistent humane shot placement (0.5"?), that becomes your extreme limit for squirrels. {But having scope settings for the other further distances will still be helpful for other uses like target shooting, working on fundamentals, reading the wind, etc., so it wasn't a waste of time.}

Back off your hunting limit by 5 yards, setup the target for the appropriate distance, and zero the scope with your recorded settings. Take a single shot. Should be right on. If not, you mis-measured the distance or mis-recorded the scope settings. If it IS right on, shoot a group. Great, now dial the zero setting for 5-yards closer, but don't change the distance to the target. Shoot another group. Make a note of where that new group compares, high/low/left/right. Clock position and distance. Set your scope zero to 5-yards farther than you actually are, shoot a group, and compare that one, too.

It will give you a good idea of drop-vs-distance, and how important a range-to-target is before taking the shot on an actual squirrel.

This will let you make a card for that scope/rifle/ammo combo. For the distances you will see.

It all can change if you tweak the power settings on the Benjamin, or remove or change the scope, or swap ammo.

After all that, you've got a personalized fill pressure, expected consistent shot string number, and scope dope card with ranges/zeroes/drop. Since the Benjamin SAM advertises an FPE of about 22, as long as you don't stretch the hunting shot too far, that .22 pellet should have enough energy to humanely do its job.
Wow! More details then I expected. Printed your advise out for my use.

thank you
 
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